Monday, June 21

What I Missed - Part Two - Mao Asada Programs

Mao has announced her competitive programs for the 2011 season: the short program being a tango by Alfred Schnittke, which I expect to be the music starting at 2:50 in this video:



This particular "Tango" is on the same CD as the widely-circulated "Tale of Wanders" that was first used by Maria Butyrskaya during the 2002 season, and Ksenia Doronina also uses it in the above video. We shall see. Tatiana Tarasova will be choreographing.

Mao is using "Liebestraum" by Franz Liszt for the free skate. A beautiful piece that I used to play on the piano back in the day, it actually hasn't been used too often in skating.. at least not lately. One of the most successful programs in recent time to the music was Jennifer Robinson's 2002 free skate, where she had a 7th place finish in the Olympics and an 9th place finish at Worlds, with this skate:



Lori Nichol will be choreographing the free skate. I begged the "Skate Gods" some months ago to let Mao return to her Chopin-esque light classical style that she skated so well a few seasons ago, and this sounds like a step in the right direction. I'm definitely excited to see this program.

I had to edit in this performance to "Liebestraum" by Ilia Kulik from the 1997 Art of Russian Skating special. It is choreographed by Tarasova!

3 comments:

Delonjo said...

Oh noooooo! Liebestraum?! WTF! I'm furious! I don't want to watch her skate to that depressing claptrap. Yeah, it's a legendary tune and it is beautiful, but so were the other pieces of muzak that Tarasova burdened Asada with the past two seasons. Oh nooooooooo...I'm in tears.

Anonymous said...

Huh? Liebestraum isn't depressing. Certainly not in comparison to Bells Of Moscow.

Delonjo said...

I remember it as the piano tune that Bette Davis kept requesting the piano man play at that sad-sack dinner party in "All About Eve" while she guzzled her powerful white liquor. I can't get that saaadddddd tune out of my head nor can I get the woozy look on Bette's face as the piano man clunked on each note.